Protractor Testing with Google Map Markers and Markerclusterers, Part 1

While doing e2e testing on an AngularJS app using Protractor, I came across the need to find the markers in a google map within the app. This was further complicated by the fact that we were using MarkerclustererPlus, which meant on the map there could be a mixture of single markers and cluster markers.

This first part is just a bit of an introduction, so if you want, you can go straight to Part 2 which shows how to find the Google Maps markers in a Protractor spec or Part 3 for using markerclusterer.

What is a Markerclusterer?

If you are not familiar with markerclusterers, it is a google maps utility library which deals with maps that have too many markers or are too cluttered, by combining markers that are close together into cluster markers. Have a look at the example page:

http://google-maps-utility-library-v3.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/markerclusterer/docs/examples.html

Also note there are actually 2 libraries, markerclusterer and markerclustererplus.

I’m assuming that the reader is already familiar with setting up and using Protractor for testing AngularJS applications.

AngularJS and Google Maps

Being an AngularJS app, I decided to use a directive to create the Google map.

There are a few AngularJS map directive libraries around, but the one I decided upon was ng-map.  The advantage of this particular library was that although you can just use its tags to create the map, it also allows you to use the Google Maps V3 Javascript API directly. This is very useful, for instance even though there was a markerclusterer tag, I just wrote the code in Javascript which was more flexible and easier to debug (the author of the library also seems to recommend this approach for complicated code).

So for this application, the map libraries that were used were:

Count the Markers …

The spec file I was working on needed to count the number of markers that were displayed on the map. Now as I mentioned earlier, because I was using the markerclusterer library, the markers could appear as single markers (i.e. the default Google Maps markers) or as cluster markers, and the number of markers and clusters would vary depending on the zoom level of the map.

Therefore in the tests I needed code to find:

  • single markers
  • cluster markers
  • the number of markers contained in each cluster marker

In the next post, I will show how to find the single markers displayed on the map. All you will need are web tools that can inspect elements in a web page, such as Firebug or the Chrome Developer Tools.

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